Browse By

TechTatva’16: Mechanize

From building engines to learning about CAD software, Mechanize is where you simulate what you visualize. It covered all the bases of Mechanical Engineering, from building and designing to problem-solving and analysis. Mechanize hosted five events which involved building a Stirling Engine, getting familiar with CATIA, and tackling different problems and riddles.

Stirling Engine
Adhiraj Ghosh

Held on the first and second days of TechTatva’16, Stirling Engine’ required its participants to build a primitive model of a fully functioning Stirling Engine, having learned the principles behind it during the pre-TechTatva’16 workshops. The first round was a written test comprising thirty questions, which were well-received and appreciated by the participants. However, a lack of adequate participation dampened an otherwise well organised event.

The second round required the participants to build a prototype of the Stirling Engine within the stipulated time of two hours. While the organisers were kept on their toes, the participants exceeded expectations as they toiled to ensure that the event ticked most of the boxes. “Even though the Stirling engine has become obsolete now, it was a brilliant piece of technology for its time and we, at Mechanize, wanted to spread awareness about how technology has evolved through the ages”, said Animesh Tiwari, the Event Head for Stirling Engine.

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Hydromania
Abhinav Kumar

Hydromania was conducted on the second and third days of TechTatva’16. Unlike Stirling Engine, Hydromania produced a decent turnout with thirty three participants, divided into seventeen teams of two. Participants were asked to build a working model of the hydraulic crane in the first round, within two hours. The participants were given a problem statement and the required materials, while the organisers kept rushing around to assist the participants. There were no air bubbles in the hydraulics of this round, as six teams qualified for the finals.

In the final round, the six teams that made it through were asked to build a working model of the hydraulic steering system. This steering system was later installed in a miniature car, which had to navigate its way through a series of obstacles. The initial demonstration could have been better, according to one team. Nevertheless, everything else functioned smoothly without a hiccup as Mechanize pulled off a successful event.

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

a’Maze of Plans
Deepali Sahu

Making its TechTatva debut, a’Maze of Plans hit the ball right out of the park with a turnout of about sixty-six participants. Organised on the third and fourth day of TechTatva’16, the event involved brain-teasers and riddles. The organisers even managed to set up a riddle station outside Higginbotham’s. In round one, the participants had to go on a scavenger hunt looking for different parts of the riddle, with each clue carrying points of five, three, or two, depending on the difficulty of the riddle. Four teams managed to make it to the finals.

Round two appealed to finalists who had an aptitude for architecture. The teams were asked to design castles for themselves. Each team was then asked questions. For every right answer, the team was given a chance to break down the opposing team’s castle with a custom made catapult. Teams were given marks on the basis of number of bricks displaced from their castle. While a few participants felt that the system of scoring was unfair because responses deserved extra marks as well, the event proceeded without any further discrepancy. “We’ve been working on this event for about two months now. I’m glad people are enjoying themselves”, said an enthused Nishant Garg, the event head for a’Maze of Plans.

Picture Credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Picture Credits: The Photography and Videography Department

CAD.IT.UP
Karan Hiranandani

The organisers of Mechanize planned to test the designing skills of participants by asking them to sketch and design on CATIA. Round one was conducted over the first two days, while the second and final round was conducted on the fourth. With a decent turnout of thirty-six students, round one required the participants to design ten 2-D sketches on CATIA within ninety minutes. The participation ranged from experienced third years to a fresher who had learned CATIA from Mechanize’s pre-TechTatva workshop. Five teams managed to qualify for the finals.

Round two went up a notch. The five teams were asked to design three 3-D models. One of them was a piston. While the participants had an actual piston to draw inspiration from, the second model was an image, and the third was a diving board for which the participants had to rely on their sheer imagination and creativity.

Picture Credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Picture Credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Domino Mechanics
Sriya Koduru

‘Domino Mechanics’ disappointed in terms of turnout. With only five teams registering, the event failed to make the cut. ‘Domino Mechanics’ involved stacking dominos and creating a chain reaction in the most innovative manner.

Round one was a general aptitude test. One representative from each team took part in the screening test. Round two required the five teams to build a long-lasting chain reaction with four hundred dominos in two hours. The participants were encouraged to use their personal possessions as well. The more innovative the chain reaction, the more number of points the team would earn. “It took us all our strength to not give up mid-way. I never thought stacking a bunch of blocks in an orderly fashion would be this taxing”, said Saurak, one of the participants.

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Picture credits: The Photography and Videography Department

Join the official Facebook Freshers' group!Join
+ +